Hawaii Today edited by Derek Paiva

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Pacific Hall's atrium, with its inlaid wood floor map of the Pacific, and stairway mural depicting migration pathways. Photo: Bishop Museum.

Docent Georgia Wong stands at the entrance to the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum’s Pacific Hall with her arms extended, beckoning us closer.

“I’m going to take you on a voyage,” she says to the half-dozen visitors who have assembled for a guided tour of the museum’s newly renovated and renamed hall. As I move forward with the group, my gaze is pulled upward to scenes of marine life and rolling waves playing across a 29-foot video screen suspended from the hall’s second-floor ceiling. The moving images bathe the hall in a gentle blue light, fitting for an exhibition space designed to celebrate the 6,000-year history of human migration across the Pacific Ocean.

Wong’s first stop on our tour is a large map of the Pacific, inlaid into the hall’s gleaming wood floor. Pointing to Asia and the vast Pacific beneath our feet, she tells the story of the countless adventurers who left their home islands, traveling thousands of miles across open sea in voyaging canoes, their destinations often unknown. Wong then turns our attention toward a modern mural at the top of the hall’s grand staircase, depicting migration pathways, stars and canoes, all flowing over expansive ocean.

 “All of the people of Oceania are in [the mural] because we are still here,” Wong says. “There is a story and a pattern to Polynesia. It is not just the voyage. In the Islands, there are so many interactions.”

Goodbye, Polynesian Hall. Welcome, Pacific Hall.

Nestled in the urban Honolulu neighborhood of Kalihi, the 125-year-old Bishop Museum campus is Hawai‘i’s premier research and cultural museum, home to the largest collection of historic, scientific and cultural Polynesian artifacts in the world. The museum’s first and oldest buildings, Hawaiian Hall and adjacent Polynesian Hall, have always been its crown jewels, constructed in the Richardsonian Romanesque architectural style popular in the 1890s and housing the bulk of the museum’s Hawaiian and Polynesian artifacts.

 

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Mauna Loa lava channel on March 28, 1984. Photo: USGS

This Tuesday marks the 30th anniversary of the last eruption of the Big Island's Mauna Loa volcano.

At 1:30 a.m. on March 25, 1984, the largest active volcano on Earth woke up suddenly and spectacularly after nine years of slumber. The eruption sent several fast-moving fingers of lava down Mauna Loa’s gentle slopes, primarily over old flows and through upslope forests. One of the fastest of these fingers of molten earth quickly took direct aim at Hilo, the Big Island’s largest city, putting its residents on high alert in the days that followed.

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Mauna Loa curtain of fire, one hour after the start of the eruption, March 25, 1984. Photo: USGS

The eruption ended three weeks after it began, its longest finger of lava stopping just four miles from the nearest Hilo home. Mauna Loa has been quiet ever since.

Prior to its recent three decade eruptive dry spell, Mauna Loa had erupted 33 times since 1843—an average rate of one eruption every five years. Going further back into research on the 13,680-foot volcano’s eruptive history, scientists at the Hawaii Volcano Observatory say Mauna Loa has erupted about once every six years for the last 3,000 years.

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Mauna Loa lava flow at night, as seen from Hilo. Photo: David Little/USGS

So why hasn’t Mauna Loa erupted in the last three decades? (See next page.)


 


Photo: CBS

Looks like another year of Daniel Dae Kim’s megawatt smile, circular Kakaako police chases, the comedic bromace of one Det. Danny “Danno” Williams and Lt. Commander Steve McGarrett, and (crossing fingers) way more Michelle Borth.

CBS has green-lighted Hawaii Five-0 for a fifth season, presumably beginning in September.

The fifth-season pick-up for the Oahu-filmed crime drama was hardly a surprise. A move for the series last fall from its three-season Monday primetime home to Friday nights has boosted per episode Nielsen ratings for Five-0 and overall Friday night viewership for CBS so far this season. Between season three and season four, the average audience for new Five-0 episodes has risen by nearly a million viewers.


Jorge Garcia and Daniel Dae Kim. Photo: CBS

Better yet—for Lost fans, anyway—the next season of Five-0 will make permanent the current season's reunion of Jin-Soo Kwon and Hugo “Hurley” Reyes. CBS also announced that Jorge Garcia will join Five-0 as a regular cast member beginning with the 2014-15 season, assuring his conspiracy theorist character Jerry Ortega will likely get lots of screen time with ex-high school classmate Lt. Chin Ho Kelly, played by Kim. Garcia and Kim were principal cast members of the Oahu-filmed ABC adventure-drama Lost for its entire six season run between 2004 and 2010.

The rest of Five-0’s current principal cast includes Alex O’Loughlin (McGarrett), Scott Caan (Danno), Grace Park (Kona “Kono” Kalakaua), Masi Oka (Dr. Max Bergman) and Michelle Borth (Lt. Catherine Rollins).

Sadly, there's no word yet on the return of McGarrett's seemingly indestructible arch nemesis, Wo Fat, and his alter ego, actor Mark Dacascos. But we're crossing fingers. Stay tuned.

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go_airlines_hawaii_interisland_airline_shutting_down
Wikipedia Commons

Interisland air carrier go! Airlines announced yesterday that it will shut down passenger service on April 1.

The airline will continue operating its current flight schedule through March 31.

If you have confirmed reservations for go! flights on April 1, 2014 or beyond,  the airline said in a statement that it will be contacting all passengers holding tickets and attempt to book them on flights operated by Hawaiian Airlines. If go! is unable to book passengers with tickets on Hawaiian Airlines flights, a refund will be offered. More information is available on the carrier’s website or by calling (888) 435-9462.

If you have confirmed reservations for go! flights between now and March 31, 2014, the carrier said it will be operating its full flight schedule until end of day March 31 and will be honoring all confirmed reservations up until that date.

Arizona-based Mesa Air Group, which had owned and operated go! since first commencing Hawaii interisland passenger service in June 2006, said in a media release yesterday that it was ceasing its Hawaii operations to pursue "significant" growth in its Mainland U.S. flight operations. The decision, according to Mesa chairman and CEO Jonathan Ornstein, was also based on a “long-term increase in the cost of fuel, which has more than doubled since go! began service and has caused profitability to be elusive.”

The statement said that all of go! airlines’ Hawaii-based employees would be offered employment with Mesa Air Group. As the carrier plans to shut down all of its Hawaii operations, however, employment opportunities with Mesa will presumably be Mainland U.S. based.

Currently, go! operates 30 daily interisland flights with two 50-seat Bombadier CRJ200 jets. It’s exit from the Hawaii market leaves Hawaiian Airlines and subsidiary carrier Ohana by Hawaiian, Island Air and Mokulele Air as the state’s primary interisland air carriers.

Click here for the go! Airlines website.


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St. Patrick's Day celebration outside Murphy's Bar & Grill. Photo by David Croxford.

Oahu may not seem like a hot bed for Irish culture. But come St. Patrick’s Day, you’d think it were the Emerald Isle, especially in Waikiki and, of all places, Downtown Honolulu's Chinatown district.

Among the holiday highlights are the 47th annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade and the 27th annual St. Patrick's Day Chinatown area block party. The epicenter for the latter is the intersection of Merchant Street and Nuuanu Avenue—near Murphy’s Bar & Grill and O’Toole’s Irish Pub. The area is unofficially dubbed “Honolulu’s Irish Corner.” But first, let's talk about that parade.

The St. Patrick’s Day Parade, organized by the Society of the Friends of St. Patrick-Hawaii, will feature bands, marching groups and floats, on Mon., March 17. Set for a noon start time at Fort DeRussy Park, the parade will make its way down Waikiki main drag Kalakaua Avenue, past Kuhio Beach, and finish at Kapiolani Park at around 2 p.m. For additional information on the parade and Friends of St. Patrick Hawaii green day goings on, click here.

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Reveler at St. Patrick's Day block party. Photo by David Croxford.

If all goes as usual, this year’s St. Patrick’s Day Chinatown Block Party is sure to attract thousands of green-wearing revelers to Downtown Honolulu’s Chinatown Arts District—conveniently, just a couple of blocks from HAWAII Magazine’s offices. Murphy’s Bar & Grill starts the celebration at lunch with a menu featuring Guinness-braised lamb shanks, blarney burgers, fish and chips, and traditional corned beef and cabbage. (For every pound of corned beef sold, Murphy's donates $2 to the Hawaii Children's Cancer Foundation.)

Murphy’s will also open up its traditional (and popular) Guinness Oyster Bar ‘round lunctime, boasting hundreds of freshly shucked oysters, steamed clams, sautéed shrimp, calamari steaks and oyster shooters. For dessert, indulge in homemade Irish whiskey cake and traditional bread pudding with whiskey sauce.

Lunch service starts at 11 a.m., and the official block party kicks off at noon. But the serious celebrating starts near sundown when Merchant Street and Nuuanu Avenue close to traffic to make room for live stages featuring local bands performing Irish songs and hard-rocking tunes into the night.

For more information on the St. Patrick’s Day Chinatown block party, click here or call 808-531-0422.

Erin go bragh!
 
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No. 4: Merrimans. Photo: Merrimans Hawaii.

Last summer and fall, we asked our reader ohana to share their picks of the best of everything Hawaii for our 2014 HAWAII Magazine Readers’ Choice Awards.

Thousands of our Mainland U.S., Hawaii and international readers responded, packing their Readers’ Choice ballots with hundreds of selections for everything from their best Hawaii hotels and resorts, bed-and-breakfasts and inns, beaches, spas and golf courses to their best Hawaii places to eat, scenic road trips, fashion designers, helicopter tours, zipline courses and much, much more. All of it, in more than 90 categories.

We tallied their picks—more than 100,000 in all—to arrive at our final award-winner lists. You’ll find all 620 winners of our 2014 Readers’ Choice Awards, ranked in 96 lists, in the new March/April 2014 issue of HAWAII Magazine, on sale now nationwide or available for individual copy purchase on the Apple Newsstand for iPad and iPhone.

Purchase a subscription to HAWAII Magazine on the Apple Newsstand and you’ll get the 2014 Readers’ Choice Issue immediately as part of your subscription.

Over the next few weeks, we’ll be sharing a few of the 96 lists from our 2014 Readers’ Choice Awards Issue here on HawaiiMagazine.com. Below is the 2nd list we’re sharing:

The 10 Best Fine Dining** Restaurants in Hawaii as selected by HAWAII Magazine readers.

1. 
Mama's Fish House
Paia, Maui
(2013 ranking: 1)

2.
Roy's
Maui, Big Island, Kauai, Oahu
(2013 list ranking: 2)

3.
Alan Wong's King Street

Honolulu, Oahu
(2013 list ranking: 3)

4.
Merriman's
Big Island, Maui, Kauai
(2013 list ranking: 5)

5.
La Mer
Halekulani, Waikiki, Oahu
(2013 list ranking: 4)

6.
Lahaina Grill
Lahaina Inn, Lahaina, Maui
(new to 2014 list)

7.
Beach House Restaurant

Koloa, Kauai
(new to 2014 list)

8.
Beachhouse at the Moana

Moana Surfrider, Waikiki, Oahu
(new to 2014 list)

9.
Orchids
Halekulani, Waikiki, Oahu
(new to 2014 list)

10.
Tidepools
Grand Hyatt Kauai, Poipu, Kauai
(new to 2014 list)


Check out our 95 other "Readers' Choice Awards 2014" winners lists in the March/April issue of HAWAII Magazine, including this one ...



Hawaii_magazine_readers_choice_awards_best_fine_dining_restaurants

**Note: A "fine dining" restaurant was defined on our Readers' Choice ballots as a restaurant where patrons could expect to pay $51 or more, per person, for a meal.



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A view of the stunning Napali Coast from our fast-moving ocean raft. Photo: David Croxford for HAWAII Magazine.

It’s midday on a Wednesday and my only task at the moment is to somehow put into words the almost surreal hue of clear blue water at which I’m gazing from my seat on a Zodiac raft in gentle waves off the Napali Coast.

When the raft slows down to allow us a closer look at an enormous pod of spinner dolphins swimming past us, I ask other passengers for adjectives. Someone offers: “How about cerulean? Or cobalt?”

That’s almost right.

Our captain, Chris Turner, a longtime waterman who has plied this awe-inspiring coast for many years, turns to us and smiles.

“Windex blue,” he says in a helpful, matter-of-fact manner.

He’s absolutely spot-on, too. Oddly, Windex blue really is the almost-unearthly color of the Nāpali Coast’s offshore waters beneath a cloud-dotted sky on this sunny June day. Peering over the edge of the raft, operated by outdoor adventure company Napali Riders, we watch as the curious dolphins cruise together, cautiously circling our vessel. A few yards away, dorsal fins surface and a lone dolphin leaps above the waves for a quick, showy spin.

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Napali Riders' raft captain Chris Turner guides us through a sea cave. Photo: David Croxford for HAWAII Magazine.

With its captivating views of boundless ocean, fluted sea cliffs rising up to 4,000 feet above sea level and seemingly infinite possibilities for exploration, the Napali Coast is a nature-lover's nirvana. Ever-fascinated with the majestic north shore Kaua‘i coast, we’ve explored our fair share of it in HAWAII Magazine's pages over the years—by land, on hiking trails winding around its peaks, sheer cliff faces and shoreline; and by air, via helicopter tour. Never, however, close up by sea.

I suggested it was high time we did.

And so, earlier in the morning, my camera-toting companion and I arrived at Napali Riders’ office in the westside town of Waimea encouraged by our first sight. Passengers returning from an “early bird” tour of the coast were happily checking out photos and video from their 4½-hour raft tour. My photographer friend quickly began packing his best gear in provided waterproof bags. 

 

Top 5 favorite Hawaii hiking trails



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A eucalyptus forest on the Waipio Valley Ridge trail. Photo: Derek Paiva

A trek through a crater once filled with molten lava. A hike to the summit of one of Hawaii’s most iconic natural landmarks. A couple of lush forests hikes ending at mountain-stream-fed waterfalls. And a multi-day hike along an otherwise virtually unreachable Kauai coastline.

We’ve counted the hundreds of answers submitted by HAWAII Magazine’s Facebook reader ohana when we asked them the poll question: “What’s your favorite Hawaii hiking trail?”

Faves you sent our way that DIDN’T make the final cut included popular hikes such as the Kaena Point, Makapuu Lighthouse and Koko Head trails on Oahu; hikes into Waipio and Pololu valleys on the Big Island; a half-dozen trails traversing the summit of Haleakala volcano on Maui; and several terrific hikes in the cloud-level forests of Kauai’s Kokee State Park.

If you’d like to join in on our next HAWAII Magazine Facebook Ohana Poll and vote along with our always-growing reader family, go to the HAWAII Magazine Facebook page and “like” us. In return you’ll be able to share your answers in all of our future “Hawaii favorite” poll questions as soon as we post them, know the results of the poll when all of the votes are counted, and get all of our daily HawaiiMagazine.com photos and features.

We’ll be posting our next Ohana Poll question on HAWAII Magazine’s Facebook page in the weeks ahead, so “like” us now if you haven’t yet.

Until then, here’s the Top 5 countdown of our Facebook ohana’s favorite Hawaii hiking trails.


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Photo: Mitchell Isoda

#5
Kilauea Iki Trail

(Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Big Island)

Kilauea, in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, is currently ranked among the most active volcanoes on the planet. The park has many trails, ranging from a quick walk through a lava tube to multi-day hikes. Among the most popular: Kilauea Iki Trail — a 4-mile loop trail through Kilauea Iki crater, the remains of a massive 1959 eruption. The trail begins off the park’s Crater Rim Drive near the Thurston Lava Tube. Its more than 400-foot descent takes hikers through a variety of scenery—lush fern- and foliage-filled rainforests, with native birds in the trees, near active steam and sulfur vents and across a long-solidified lava lake. Follow rock cairns across the crater floor. Bring sunscreen as well as rain gear as daily weather can shift from warm and sunny to cool, wet and windy.

Click here
for more detailed trail info.

Next page: #4 favorite Hawaii hiking trail
 
 

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Honolulu Festival Grand Parade in Waikiki. Photo: Honolulu Festival Foundation

If you’re on Oahu this weekend, check out the multitude of music, art, dance and food of Hawaii and the Pacific Rim set for this year’s 20th annual Honolulu Festival, one of the state’s premiere cultural events.

The theme of this year’s festival, which starts this Friday and ends Sunday at various locations in and around Waikiki, is “Pacific Harmony” reflecting the Honolulu Festival Foundation’s mission of sharing the diverse cultures of the Pacific region with attendees.

The three-day Honolulu Festival happens every March. This year’s fest again promises thousands of musicians, dancers and artists from Japan, Australia, Tahiti, the Philippines, Taiwan, Korea, Alaska and, of course, Hawai‘i. Much of it is free and open to the public.

The Honolulu Festival weekend events schedule kicks off Fri., March 7, with music and dance performances at the annual Friendship Gala at the Hawaii Convention Center. The gala, set for 6:30 p.m., is the only Honolulu Festival event that isn’t free. Think an evening of great food from a handful of Oahu’s top restaurants—including Morimoto Waikīkī, Mariposa at Neiman Marcus, Roy’s Hawai‘i Kai, 3660 on the Rise, Nobu Waikiki, Shokudo Japanese Restaurant and La Palme D'or Patisserie, among others—and you get the picture. The $85 ticket price supports the Honolulu Festival Foundation’s school-based cultural and educational programs.

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Daijayama in Grand Parade. Photo: Honolulu Festival Foundation

Live performances—everything from hula and Japanese dance to Okinawan taiko drumming—continues on Sat., March 8, through Sunday, March 9, at the Hawaii Convention Center, Ala Moana Center's Center Stage and all over Waikiki. The Honolulu Festival’s Craft Fair will be open at the Hawai‘i Convention Center from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday.

On Sat., March 8, the Honolulu Rainbow Ekiden will be held. This long-distance relay race, first developed in Japan more than 90 years ago, begins at 9 a.m. in Waikiki with a course taking runners around Diamond Head and back to Kapiolani Park. The park will also host the WaikiKitchen Food Festival with various vendors serving up their specialties after the race.

Ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro will perform a free benefit concert from 3 to 4 p.m. on Sun., March 9 at Lewers Street in Waikiki. The concert benefits continuing relief and rebuilding efforts following the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami.

The festival’s marquee event happens after the concert: the Honolulu Festival Grand Parade and Fireworks, starting at 4 p.m. The annual march down Waikiki’s main drag Kalakaua Avenue features floats, entertainment and the popular Daijayama—a 33-foot-long smoke-and-fire breathing dragon from Kyushu, Japan, manipulated by more than 200 handlers. The parade will culminate with Japan’s internationally renowned Nagaoka Fireworks display lighting up the skies over Waikiki Beach at 8:30 p.m.

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Honolulu Festival Friendship Gala at the Hawaii Convention Center. Photo: Honolulu Festival Foundation

Finally, congratulations to the winner of our 2014 Honolulu Festival Oahu Flyaway contest, Steve Pinney of Romeoville, Ill. Steve and a very fortunate guest of his arrive in Honolulu on Thursday via a complimentary Hawaiian Airlines flight to begin collecting the rest of his prize: five-days/four-nights complimentary oceanfront accommodations at the Hawaii Prince Hotel Waikiki, two tickets to the Honolulu Festival Friendship Gala, VIP seats for the Honolulu Festival Waikiki Grand Parade, a $150 Ala Moana Center dining gift card, and a complimentary Atlantis Adventures Premium Submarine Tour for two.

Enjoy your Oahu visit and the fest, Steve!


Honolulu Festival
March 7-9 • For more information on the festival and its full weekend event schedule, visit the Honolulu Festival website.


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Hawaii_magazine_readers_choice_awards_best_luxury_hotels_and_resorts
No. 1: Four Seasons Resort Hualalai at Historic Kaupulehu. Photo: Four Seasons Resorts.

Last summer and fall, we asked our reader ohana to share their picks of the best of everything the Hawaiian Islands have to offer for our 2014 HAWAII Magazine Readers’ Choice Awards.

Thousands of our Mainland U.S., Hawaii and international readers responded, packing their Readers’ Choice ballots with hundreds of selections for everything from their best Hawaii hotels and resorts, bed-and-breakfasts and inns, beaches and indoor and outdoor activities to their best Hawaii places to eat, scenic road trips, fashion designers, coastlines and much, much more. All of it, in more than 90 categories

We tallied their picks—more than 100,000 in all—to arrive at our final award-winner lists. You’ll find all 620 winners of our 2014 Readers’ Choice Awards, ranked in 96 lists, in the new March/April 2014 issue of HAWAII Magazine, on sale now nationwide or available for individual copy purchase on the Apple Newsstand for iPad and iPhone.

Purchase a subscription to HAWAII Magazine on the Apple Newsstand and you’ll get the 2014 Readers’ Choice Issue immediately as part of your subscription.

Over the next few weeks, we’ll be sharing a few of the 96 lists from our 2014 Readers’ Choice Awards Issue here on HawaiiMagazine.com. Below is the first list we’re sharing:

The
20 Best Luxury Hotels and Resorts in Hawaii as selected by HAWAII Magazine readers.


1.
Four Seasons Resort Hualalai at Historic Kaupulehu
Kailua-Kona, Big Island
(2013 ranking: 6)

2.
Grand Wailea
Wailea-Makena, Maui
(2013 list ranking: 2)

3.
Halekulani
Waikiki, Oahu
(2013 list ranking: 1)

4.
Grand Hyatt Kauai Resort & Spa
Poipu, Kauai
(2013 list ranking: 5)

5.
St. Regis Princeville Resort
Princeville, Kauai
(2013 list ranking: 4)

6.
Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel
Kohala Coast, Big Island
(2013 list ranking: 16)

7.
The Royal Hawaiian
Waikiki, Oahu
(2013 list ranking: 3)

8.
Mauna Kea Beach Hotel
Kohala Coast, Big Island
(2013 list ranking: 13)

9.
JW Marriott Ihilani Ko Olina
Ko Olina, Oahu
(2013 list ranking: 18)

10.
The Ritz-Carlton Kapalua
Kapalua, Maui
(2013 list ranking: 10)

  
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