Travel Alerts for Visitors to Hawaiʻi Due to COVID-19

Check back here for updated news on travel restrictions to the Islands.
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Updated Sept. 13, 2021

See our Travel Safety section for more updates.

 

Currently, U.S. travelers who have received their vaccination in the U.S. or any U.S. territory and have completed the required 14-day waiting period can travel between the Hawaiian Islands without taking a COVID-19 test or going into quarantine.

Vaccinated?

Children under 5 are not subject to testing or vaccination rules. But those age 5 to 11 will need to test negative to forgo a mandatory quarantine. For everyone else, here’s what you need to do: 

  • Provide a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card with your name, birthdate, type of vaccine, date(s) vaccine was administered and lot number(s) for each vaccine dose. 
  • Create an online account and register with the state’s Safe Travels Hawaiʻi program.
  • Upload a PDF file or digital image of your CDC Vaccination Record Card to the Safe Travels Hawaiʻi web portal. 
  • The day before your scheduled trip, you will need to log back into the portal to fill out the health questionnaire. After you do this, the portal will generate a QR code for you. (It will be delivered via email.) You need this. Some hotels and car rental companies may require it.
  • Travel with the digital image and the original CDC Vaccination Record Card in case it’s requested.

Not Vaccinated?

Here’s what you need to do: 

  • All U.S. travelers 18 years and older must register through the state’s mandatory Safe Travels Hawaiʻi portal.
  • Within 72 hours of departure time, each traveler 5 and older must undergo an approved COVID-19 test with negative results through one of Hawaiʻi’s trusted testing and travel partners.
  •  The negative test result(s) must be in hand when boarding your final flight leg to Hawaiʻi.
  • The day before your scheduled trip, you will need to log back into the portal to fill out the health questionnaire. After you do this, the portal will generate a QR code for you. (It will be delivered via email.) You need this. Some hotels and car rental companies may require it. 
  • On Oʻahu, you will need to show negative COVID-19 test results to get into restaurants, bars, museums and other businesses. You will not have to show it when getting takeout. On Maui, if you’re not vaccinated you will only be allowed to eat outdoors or get takeout. 

Once in the Islands, there are no restrictions to interisland travel.

Proper face coverings must be worn in all indoor public spaces and outdoor areas where physical distancing is difficult to maintain.

Starting Sept. 13 on Oʻahu only, anyone who wants to enter a restaurant, gym, bar, movie theater, other Oʻahu business or state-run facility (including public libraries) will need to show proof of vaccination or a negative FDA-approved molecular or antigen test taken in the last 48 hours. The city’s Safe Access Oʻahu program will remain in effect for 60 days. Children 12 and under are exempt from the vaccine requirements. In addition, restaurants and bars on Oʻahu have to stop serving alcohol at 10 p.m. Maui launched a similar program, which runs for 30 days, whereby unvaccinated persons will not be able to dine indoors at restaurants and bars.

 

How to Self-Quarantine:

  • You must stay in your visitor lodging/home to prevent the possible spread of COVID-19 to other people. Here’s what you need to do:
  • Do not use shared facilities such as pools, spas, gyms, restaurants or bars.
  • Ask someone to drop of food or other necessities at your front door or order room service or use delivery services.
  • Do not go to public places such as the beach, park, hiking trails, shopping centers, childcare, work, school or local attractions.
  • Do not let visitors in—only people who usually live with you should be in your home.

 

For more information about COVID-19 in Hawaiʻi, visit here.

SEE ALSO: What Travelers Need To Know About the Coronavirus, Updated