This replica of Iolani Palace made from gingerbread will be on display at the Hyatt Regency Waikiki Beach Resort & Spa now through Jan. 1, 2020.

Photo: Courtesy of the Hyatt Regency Waikiki Beach Resort & Spa

Check Out This Giant Gingerbread House Replica of Iolani Palace

The impressive 7-foot structure is on display now at the Hyatt Regency Waikiki Beach Resort & Spa.

This is literally a gingerbread house fit for royalty.

The culinary team at the Hyatt Regency Waikiki Beach Resort & Spa spent two months planning, baking and constructing a gingerbread structure inspired by Iolani Palace, the only official state residence of royalty in the U.S. and home to the Hawaiian Kingdom’s last two monarchs, King Kalakaua and his sister and successor, Queen Liliuokalani.

The 7-foot-tall gingerbread palace consists of 100 pounds of flour, 60 pounds of honey, 180 pounds of sugar, 100 pounds of candy and 2 gallons of egg whites.




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A gingerbread palace fit for a king and queen! ✨Yesterday we joined @hyattregencywaikiki in the unveiling of this culinary masterpiece. Hyatt Regency Waikiki's Chef Scott Robertson and the culinary team spent two months planning, baking, and assembling the gingerbread structure inspired by Iolani Palace. 100 pounds of flour, 60 pounds of honey, 30 pounds of sugar, along with icing made from 150 pounds of sugar and 2 gallons of egg whites make up this marvelous creation! Hyatt Regency Waikiki's connection to Iolani Palace is sacred. After King Kalakaua died, Queen Kapiolani retreated to Pualeilani, Waikiki (the property's current location), where she later passed away. Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole and his wife, Princess Kahanu Kaauwai, moved to Pualeilani and became the last residents of Hawaiian royal decent to live in that location. Check it out for yourself at Hyatt Regency Waikiki Beach Resort & Spa on their second-floor lobby. Happy Holidays!

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There’s actually a connection between the hotel and Iolani Palace: Built by King Kalakaua, the palace was home to his wife, Queen Kapiolani, and their two sons. After Kalakaua died in 1891, his wife retreated to Pualeilani in Waikiki—the current location of the Hyatt Regency Waikiki—where she later passed away. Their son, Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole and his wife, Princess Kahanu Kaauwai, moved to Pualelilani and became the last residents of Hawaii royal descent to live in this location.

The actual Iolani Palace in Downtown Honolulu.
Photo: Getty Images

The gingerbread structure pays homage to the visually stunning palace, which was built in 1879 and features a unique American-Florentine style of architecture. This royal residence included Hawaii’s first electric light system, flush toilets and intra-house telephones. (Interested in touring the palace? Click here.)

SEE ALSO: See Iolani Palace's Hidden Relics That Once Belonged to Hawaiian Royalty

The gingerbread replica will be on display now through Jan. 1, 2020 in the resort’s lobby.