We'll take all the mochi, thanks. 

Photo By Aaron Yoshino

Where to get Hawaii's multicultural mochi on Oahu

Hawaii loves its mochi, and nowhere is that more apparent than at these Oahu stores.

How does Hawaii like its mochi? Let us count the ways. No matter which culture these tasty tidbits are from, they're made from sugar, rice and everything nice, and we're into that. Here are some places on Oahu to get your local-style, Korean, Chinese, Japanese or Filipino mochi fix.  

Modern

modern mochi
Colorful vegan options from Peace Café.
Photo: Aaron Yoshino

Peace Café’s vegan cakes come in splashy flavors, such as these two eye-catchers in green tea almond and tangy blueberry lemon. 2239 S. King St., Honolulu.

Korean

korean mochi
Korean style mochi from Hae Dong Sang Hoe. 
Photo: Aaron Yoshino

Korean rice cakes are harder and less sugary than Japanese mochi, but these pretty kulduk balls from Korean grocery store Hae Dong Sang Hoe have a syrupy filling for added sweetness. 1213 10th Ave., Honolulu.

Local 

butter mochi
If you see these at a potluck, grab them first... otherwise they'll be gone in a blink.
Photo: Aaron Yoshino

It’s not a potluck without butter mochi, a cake-y creation that’s just as decadent as it sounds, found at grocery stores including Times Supermarket and Foodland. Times Supermarket Kaimuki, 3221 Waialae Ave., Honolulu.

Korean

korean mochi
If more herby and less sweet is your style, try these mung bean Korean mochi cakes from Hae Dong Sang Hoe.
Photo: Aaron Yoshino

This mung-bean-studded songpyun—not so sweet, with a sharp herbal flavor—is just one of the many rice cakes at Hae Dong Sang Hoe. 1213 10th Ave., Honolulu.

Local

chichi dango
Chichi dango from Nisshodo Candy Store, a longtime Honolulu fixture. 
Photo: David Croxford

Nisshodo Candy Store’s chichi dango gets its pillowy texture from the addition of powdered milk. Building I-5, 1095 Dillingham Blvd., Honolulu.

Filipino

cascarons
Fried sugary goodness on a stick from Valerio's Tropical Bakeshop.
Photo: Aaron Yoshino

Cascarons are heavenly balls of sugary, fried, coconut-y mochi served on a stick. Get them at Valerio’s Tropical Bakeshop. 94-050 Farrington Hwy., Waipahu.

Japanese

japanese mochi
Minamoto Kitchoan's sakura mochi is all that with a sakura petal on top.
Photo: Aaron Yoshino

Japan’s Minamoto Kitchoan’s high-end confections include this pretty sakura mochi, which comes topped with a salted cherry blossom. Ala Moana Center, First Level, 1450 Ala Moana Blvd., Honolulu.

Chinese

jin dui
Often served at dim sum restaurants these sesame jin dui balls conceal delicious bean paste inside. 
Photo: Aaron Yoshino

Head to Sing Cheong Yuan Bakery for jin dui. The pastry’s fried, sesame-seed-coated exterior hides a soft interior packed with fillings such as black bean paste. 1027 Maunakea St., Honolulu.

Japanese

japanese
The mochi most people are familiar with is the classic daifuku style. 
Photo: Aaron Yoshino

Minamoto Kitchoan’s classic daifuku mochi is filled with a sweet azuki bean paste. Ala Moana Center, First Level, 1450 Ala Moana Blvd., Honolulu.

Korean

kong duk
Lovers of adventurous texture will enjoy the kong duk from Hae Dong Sang Hoe.
Photo: Aaron Yoshino

A variety of beans coat the top of this kong duk, adding a unique and unusual texture and flavor. Hae Dong Sang Hoe, 1213 10th Ave., Honolulu.